Sketching Ireland #9

Waterford & Wexford Counties

We are finally getting into the third leg of my Irish itinerary adventure. I need to clarify that Sketching Ireland is again a fantasy vacation. I am a quadriplegic vicariously driving through the highways of Ireland. How? I thank the Lord and Google for a fantastic internet virtual programs called Google Earth & Maps. You see, when I implement Google’s Street View program, I get a 360 degree picture of the place I’m exploring. It is like I am almost there. I am doing this for fun and also as a way to promote myself as a graphic illustrationist and as a virtual assistant.

Anyway, from Kilkenny (our last stop), we go back on the M9 and head south. I don’t mind saying that I was really tempted to make several stops. Google Earth displayed several markers to say that there may be interesting attractions there. But I decided to stay the course and head straight to Waterford. The M9 ended at the River Suir which was the natural boundary between County Kilkenny and County Waterford. We crossed the river on a very modern bridge unto a highway that hugged the river to another highway that goes into the city.

road-map-wf.jpg

[1] Waterford, which means in old Norse as “ram fjord”, started out as a Viking settlement back in 853 AD. It is said that the city is the oldest, historical and quite an upbeat city in the sunny south-east Ireland (www.ireland.com). This is definately a must see place, however, we are not going into city just yet.

My Ireland Itinerary Plan suggest we first head to the coast to Hook Head which is actually across the river in another county (Wexford). How do we get there? By ferry, of course!

[2] Passage East Ferry

WF-ferry-w.jpg

So, we circumvented Waterford using the by-pass expressway that is south of the city to a fishing village called Passage East. That is where we catch the ferry that frequently crosses the River Suir. Because I love ferries, well sketching one was a no brainer.

[3] Hook Lighthouse, Co. Wexford

From the ferry, we head south to a narrow peninsula to the village of Churchtown on Hook Head. Driving farther down from Churchtown, we followed a two-lane road to the rocky tip of the peninsula where we found the oldest working lighthouse in the world. This is clearly a tourist destination complete with guided tours, rest rooms, restaurant and even handicap access. There were a number of photos of the lighthouse and waves breaking on a rocky shores. I decided to hold off on sketching this scene for later but instead I opted to make a thunbnail sketch and place it on the map.

Upon driving toward the lighthouse, I noticed (via Street-View) a camper parked off the road. Seeing no no-camping signage anywhere, I wonder about boondocking here overnight. Afterall, I am vicariously towing a souped up off-the-grid teardrop trailer. Ah… imagine waking up to gulls squacking and waves crashing.

[4] An Abandoned Cottage in

 

WF-graigue-cottage-w.jpgOn the way back to where the ferry is, I turned off unto the wrong country road. Fortunately, I was happy to find an abandoned cottage which was practically overgrown with foliage. This was a definate sketch subject. (By the way, the kid on the bike is a re-use.)

[click here for Google Map STREET-VIEW link]

[5] Fishing Boat

WF-boats-w.jpg

My next sketch subject is a fishing boat that was moored at the same fishing village where the ferry took me across the river.

[6] Wedding on the Island

On my way back to Waterford, I came upon a small island east of the city. It had no other name except “The Island”. Frankly, I was hoping for an Irish name or even a Viking one. The island had a 16th-century castle that was converted into a classy hotel and an extensive golfing range through out most of the island. The island was also a popular wedding destination. Access here is by a small ferry.

WF-wed-lane-w.jpg

I was only attracted to it because Google Earth was displaying a great many photo markers, two of which caught my attention and I did not hesitate into combine one sketch subject.

In my next posting, we’re going into Waterford.

—————————————————-

If you like my work and want to support my writing and artwork, please donate into my PAYPAL account [click below]

DONATE TO MY PAYPAL

Thank you.

Sketching Ireland #6

Kilkenny – At Last!

LOL! We’re finally completing the first leg of the itinerary that I’m following based on a travel blob by Wanderlust Crew. We’re getting into Kilkenny Ireland. Technically, the first leg should have taken only a few hours drive on the M9 from Dublin, but with my detours… hahaha… we’re about 5 days later, give or take (vicariously, of course).

Kilkenny, which means “church of Cainnech”, may be the smallest city in Ireland, but for a time during the 17th century Kilkenny was unofficially the capital of Ireland. Built on both banks of the River Nore, this 400 year plus city is a tourist destination, and its environs include historic buildings such as Kilkenny Castle, St. Canice’s Cathedral and round tower, Rothe House, Shee Alms House, Black Abbey, St. Mary’s Cathedral, Kilkenny Town Hall, St. Francis Abbey, Grace’s Castle, and St. John’s Priory. Kilkenny is also known for its craft and design workshops, the Watergate Theatre, public gardens and museums. Annual events include Kilkenny Arts Festival, the Cat Laughs comedy festival and music at the Kilkenny Roots Festival. [contents from Wikipedia]

google-maps-kil1.jpg

Before we head in to the city, we’re making a quick stop at the Paddy’s Country Pub just off the M9 for a late breakfast or a brunch. Based on Tripadvisor dot com, a commentary recommended Irish Bacon and Cabbage. I loved sketching this pub. The front all the way up to the roof was covered with a thick vine foliage.

kilkenny-paddy-w.jpg

google-maps-kil2.jpgAfter breakfast, we got back on the M9 and because I’m using the hover mode on Google Earth/Map, I can see that I have two exit the M9 and take the N10 into Kilkenny.

If this was an actual vacation and not a vicarious one, I would not want to bring my towed tear drop camper into a busy city. So, we needed to find someplace to camp. Fortunately, after doing some googling, I found the Tree Grove which was south of the city and conveniently just off the N10. The campground was the only one listed in the area. After ditching the trailer, we got back on the N10 and work our way back to the North side of the city to meet up with some people.

Kilkenny is divided by the River Nore. We drove around the eastern side of the city which happened to be quite modern. Most of the touristy stuff is on the western side. We were in the Newpark district when we drove by a marsh.

kilkenny-marsh-w.jpg

The Newpark Fen or Marsh is a diverse habitat with open water and a rich variety of bird, mammal, plant and insect species. It was designated an area of scientific interest and is recognised as being of local scientific importance. It is a most important natural reserve with no less than 49 different species of birds identified to date and more than 70 species of plants, trees and shrubs. It includes a bird feeding area, wildlife information boards, a 2km circular walk and a wheelchair accessible walkway. In my sketch of the marsh, I included an Irish duck on the foreground. After the marsh, we head for the river.

The River Nore is a 140-kilometre (87 mi) long river. Along with the River Suir and River Barrow, it is one of the constituent rivers of the group known as the Three Sisters. After it flows through the city it will eventually end up emptying into the Celtic Sea way far south. When you have a river like the Nore in a tourist city, what can you expect? Kayaking!

kilkenny-kayaks-w.jpg

By the way, those people we’re meeting, happen to be my brother and his wife. That’s them in my sketch. Well, in reality, that’s their faces on the bodies of actual kayakers on the actual River Nore. Supposedly, they would have leisurely kayaked down the river under bridges and past the Kilkenny Castle then land near the campground. Meanwhile, as we crossed the Green’s Bridge again, I spotted a giant sundial.

kilkenny-sundial-w.jpg

It is the Monumental Sundial entitled Arch and Sundial in the garden beside Green’s Bridge. The Arts Council (sometimes called the Arts Council of Ireland) commisioned artist Brian King to mark the success of Kilkenny in the Tidy Towns competition in 1985. A nearby plaque tells the user how to read the sundial and how to convert sun time to watch time. The Arabic hour numerals are carved into the seats of the pinic stools. [contents from http://www.sundials-ireland.com]

In my next post, we go to Kilkenny Medeivel Mile. See you then.

——————————————————-

If you like my work and want to support my writing and artwork, please donate into my PAYPAL account [click below]

DONATE TO MY PAYPAL

Thank you.

Sketching Ireland #2

Hitting the Road on an Indian

 

indian-teardrop-w.jpgWell, here we (my wife & I) are in Dublin (vicariously, of course). We’re ready to hit the road and get out of the city. Now… since, this is a fantasy vacation, I’m going to imagine a set of wheels that I have always wanted to ride in a cross country adventure, an Indian Motorcycle. Before I get any hate mail from any Harley-Davidson lovers, let me say that I would love to ride a ‘Hog’. But it was a toss up between a Harley and an Indian. My wife was the one that flipped the coin and the Indian won out. Now, my road trip fantasy is not complete without a teardrop camper fully rigged with solar panels, compact air-conditioner, kitchen galley and state of the art satellite internet retractable dish (so, we can watch Netflix and Youtube. LOL). Keep in mind, that I’m also pretending to have loads of cash.

road-map-2.jpgSo, now we have to head out of Dublin based on the tour itinerary map that I chose to follow. From Dublin, we go inland and south on the M9 Highway to the city of Kilkenny. Along the highways out of the city, the sights that I can see were mostly business and industrial parks. I figured that the residence communities were far from the noises of heavy traffic. Anyway, for Irish highways, they seem typical to highways in my own country. They’re four lanes; 2 lanes going back to Dublin and 2 going south. After spending a longwhile on these highways using the Google Street View mode, I’m making a little change on the ground rules I set for myself on my first post. To keep me from going crazy, I’m allowing myself to kinda hover above the highways and roads… giving me birds eye view. By the time we got unto the M9, the environ changed more to country settings.

BALLYTORE

Hovering over the highway gave me an opportunity to see the interesting names of towns and villages left and right of M9; villages with names like Kilgowan, Kilcullen, Narraghmore, and Crookstown. Now, in Google Earth & Maps, if there was a notable attraction, a symbolic icon would be visible when you hover. One such marker picqued my curiousity in the village of Ballytore. The village itself was nice, clean but somewhat modern. If it wasn’t for the Google marker, I probably would head back to M9.

Using Street View mode, I drove down Ballitore Hill Road then turned unto a narrow track called Abbyfield Lane. The lane started out paved and ran behind some newly built white track houses and businesses. Then, we hit a dirt road and to my delight, on the right side of the lane, I saw an old rock wall fencing what I conclude is an overgrown field and a ruin of… what looked like the entry of an even older stone church. Passing that, a broken down abandoned stone house jutted out slightly unto the gravel lane. I almost wanted to stop and sketch it but thank goodness I didn’t. We duck our heads (vicariously, of course) due to low hanging foliage, turned a bend, and finally came upon the target structure that was marked on the map.

old-mill-ballitore-w.jpg

It was the old Ballitore Mill. Though the structure was old, there was still a good roof on it with intact windows and a solid door. I believe it was still in operation (unconfirmed) and probably electrical. One time, the mill was driven by a water wheel. If you look at the right side of my sketch, it looks like a stream used to be dammed up behind the mill then flow down unto where the water wheel would have been. To add to my drawing, I included an old style millstone.

THE BURTOWN HOUSE, GREEN BARN and GARDENS

Burtown-bean-w.jpg

For my next sketch subject, I found another attraction marker across the M9 not too far from Ballytore. It’s the Burtown House, The Green Barn and Gardens. The Burtown House is an early Georgian villa surrounded by beautiful gardens, parkland walks and farmland. It is said that, ‘A visit to Burtown is one of the most rewarding days out to be found anywhere in Ireland’. Visitors are encouraged to wander the extensive gardens as well as appreciating numerous modern sculptures dotting around around the parkland. After which they can enjoy a hearty lunch at The Green Barn.

greenbarn-dog-w.jpg

The Green Barn, located just inside the front gates of Burtown House, is both restaurant and art gallery. It is based on old style Scandinavian barns with a New England twist, combining high ceilings, rustic textures, individual table settings, and specially designed pottery, linen and cutlery. restaurant believes in serving honest, unfussy, unpretentious food, letting the organic produce be the strength in what you eat. Seasonal ingredients are used, combining seasonal ingredients, using flavours, textures, and colours, experimenting all the time, hence offering changing menu’s that reflect what is happening in the garden.

The Green Barn’s interior spaces are rustic and contemporary, with an amazing view of the kitchen garden. Normally with different art exhibitions, large photos from the acclaimed Vanishing Ireland books, as well as sculptures from Zimbabwe and by Irish artists, with French and Dutch antiques. There is also an ever expanding array of interiors accessories, food products, books, prints and every changing objects de art.

For my sketch of the Green Barn, I chose the entrance mainly because the dog’s head is turned the same way as the logo’s fox is looking.

Funny though, for a tourist attraction, I did not see any roadside advertising billboards. Except from online, I wonder how motorists can even know about them.

For my next post, I’m temporarily going off the track (so to speak) and go east to the mountains. See ya all then.

[note: promotional contents of Burtown House, The Green Barn and Gardens are from various internet sites]
——————————————————-

If you like my work and want to support my writing and artwork, please donate into my PAYPAL account [click below]

DONATE TO MY PAYPAL

Thank you.

Sketching Ireland #1

Starting Point – DublinIreland-Itinerary-Map-1100x1039.jpg

Summer in the Philippines starts after Holy Week. And this summer, I decided that I am going to IRELAND… known as the Emerald Isle… the land of the leprechauns, the shamrock, and good ol’ Saint Patrick. Oh okay, I exaggerate. I’m actually taking a vicarious tour of Ireland by Google Earth and I’ll be following a particular road trip map with the starting point at Dublin. My goal is to SKETCH from the Neck Up through Ireland.

Now, I’m putting some ground rules on myself. Since this tour is a road trip, I’ll only be exploring highways and roads that have Street View function. Street View is a technology featured in Google Maps and Google Earth that provides me with interactive panoramic views. I thank the Lord for Google equipping thousands of dedicated people with specialized 360 degree cameras which they mounted on all sorts of vehicles and they roamed every highway, roads, streets, to even hiking trails all over the world. This blog is going to be both a Sketching Journal and Travel Emag.

Since this is my ‘vicarious’ vacation, I’m entering Dublin by ferry from England. Now, my plan is to start at Dublin, circumvent Ireland clockwise then end back again at Dublin. I don’t want to spend too much time there in beginning. I’ll do that on the return trip. So, as a start up, I’ll explore the center of the city at the St. Stephen’s Garden (aka St Stephen’s Green).

St Stephen’s Green is Dublin’s centre public park. At 22 acres (89,000 sqm), it is the largest of the parks in Dublin’s main Georgian garden squares. I roamed all around the park and chose 2 sketch subject.

fusiliers-arch-w.jpg

The first subject is the Fusiliers’ Arch monument which forms part of the Grafton Street entrance to the park. Erected in 1907, it was dedicated to the officers, non-commissioned officers and enlisted men of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers who fought and died in the Second Boer War (1899–1902). The main structure of the arch is granite, with the inscriptions carried out in limestone and a bronze adornment on the front of the arch. It was commissioned to commemorate the four battalions of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers that served in the Second Boer war. It lists the principal battles and locations at which the fusiliers fought: Hart’s Hill, Ladysmith, Talana, Colenso, Tugela Heights, and Laing’s Nek. The names of 222 dead are inscribed on the underside of the arch.

James-Joyce-bust-w.jpgThe second subject is a bust sculpture of a famed Dubliner, James Joyce. He was an Irish novelist, short story writer, poet, teacher, and literary critic. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer’s Odyssey are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, most famously stream of consciousness. He also wrote the Dubliners which is a collection of fifteen short stories, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century.

The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by converging ideas and influences. The stories centre on Joyce’s idea of an epiphany: a moment when a character experiences a life-changing self-understanding or illumination. Many of the characters in Dubliners later appear in minor roles in Joyce’s novel Ulysses. The initial stories in the collection are narrated by child protagonists. Subsequent stories deal with the lives and concerns of progressively older people. This aligns with Joyce’s tripartite division of the collection into childhood, adolescence and maturity. [provided by Wikipedia]

Grafton-St-dublin.jpg

Now, the park is adjacent to one of Dublin’s main shopping streets, Grafton Street. I thought it would be nice to sketch a busy street of shoppers. There is a shop called ‘Butlers Chocolate Café‘, Specialist chocolatier and coffee chain, serving handmade sweets, pastries and sandwiches. I hope somebody would go in and then write to me about it. Hot chocolate would be nice.

Well, in my next post, I’ll be leaving Dublin and going south on the M9 freeway.

——————————————————-

If you like my work and want to support my writing and artwork, please donate into my PAYPAL account [click below]

DONATE TO MY PAYPAL

Thank you.