THE CENTURION’S GOSPEL – Ch3 – part 5

THE PLAN – Roman Fort 2 miles east of Bethsaida
– Sea of Galilee shoreline, BethsaidaCG-book-cover-w

Then the crowd started looking down the shoreline attracted by the sound of celebratory clapping and the high pitch ululating sound that women make with their tongues. They could not make out what was happening from their spot on the beach. So, they moved through the crowd up the bank and worked their way to the building. There they climbed up unto an already crowded platform. From that vantage point, Cornelius could just make out a circle of men surrounding a single man keeping the crowd from overwhelming him. The rabbi was not too tall. His hair was brownish and shoulder length. He sported a short clean cut beard and mustache. His face was a little long and his nose was a little aquiline. At first impression, Cornelius was disappointingly not impressed. He looked ordinary. If the crowd did not cheer for him, he would walk by him paying him no heed.

Then people started to call out to him. There were a mixture of supplications from the crowd. They wanted to be healed. They wanted their lives to be good. Some asked if he was the one. Cornelius could not tell if he could not hear them or he was ignoring them. He continued on smiling, shaking their hands and occasionally picking up a child, laughing with them. The crowd started to press around some more until he could not progress further. The rabbi then worked his way toward one of the beached boats. Next to it was a burly fisherman washing his nets.

The rabbi asked something of him gesturing to his boat. The large fisherman nodded his ascent, put down his nets and walked over to the bow of his boat. As the rabbi climbed aboard alone, the fisherman pushed the boat out onto the water and let it float out about ten feet. Then he tied it off. The rabbi called for the people to quiet down and gestured those in the front to sit down on the beach. Then he sat at the edge of the bow and in a very clear voice, he began to teach. The first thing that Cornelius noticed was the clarity of his words. The boat was ten feet from the shore. His own vantage point was at least another hundred feet with a score of people between them.

“Behold, a sower went out to sow and as he sowed, some seeds fell beside the road, and the birds came and ate them up. Others fell on the rocky places, where they did not have much soil; and immediately they sprang up, because they had no depth of soil. But when the sun had risen, they were scorched; and because they had no root, they withered away. Others fell among the thorns, and the thorns came up and choked them out. And others fell on the good soil and yielded a crop, some a hundredfold, some sixty, and some thirty. He who has ears, let him hear.” [Luke 8:4-8 NASB]

The crowd was mumbling. It was clear that there was confusion. Cornelius himself was not sure what he meant.

“He is speaking in a parable.” It was Jacob whispering to Cestus. “Oh, I wish I had parchment and pen.”

The rabbi gave two other parables about how the Kingdom of Heaven is like a man finding treasure in a field and a valuable pearl. Cornelius figured he can analyze them with Jacob later since he deemed them unimportant for the moment.

Then the rabbi spoke again. “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a man who sowed good seed in his field. But while his men were sleeping, his enemy came and sowed tares among the wheat, and went away. But when the wheat sprouted and bore grain, then the tares became evident also. The slaves of the landowner came and said to him, ‘Sir, did you not sow good seed in your field? How then does it have tares?’ And he said to them, ‘An enemy has done this!’ The slaves said to him, ‘Do you want us, then, to go and gather them up?’ But he said, ‘No; for while you are gathering up the tares, you may uproot the wheat with them. Allow both to grow together until the harvest; and in the time of the harvest I will say to the reapers, First gather up the tares and bind them in bundles to burn them up; but gather the wheat into my barn.’ ” [Matthew 13:24-31 NASB]

The mumbling in the crowd became louder. The rabbi stood and called to the burly fisherman. The fisherman waded over and whispered to his ear while gesturing out onto the lake. The fisherman spoke back shaking his head but then he ended up shrugging his shoulder. He called to his fishing partner and together they gathered their nets. They climbed into the boat and they started to row out onto deeper water. They were not too far out when they casted their nets. Cornelius was sure that they will not be successful fishing at midday. But that was not what concerned him.
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The story continues on in my next post a week from now.

If you are interested in reading the entire ebook, you can find my ebook in Amazon.com for only $1.99. Just click the link below.

Thank you

Johann Q

Jesus 101 – Depths to which you dig

Everyday, I get in my email from the Bible Gateway website, a daily verse. The verse I received below rang a bell and so, I had to write about it.

Romans 11:33
Oh, the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are His judgments and unfathomable His ways!

I remember hearing this insightful modern day parable. This is how it went.

A young farmer was working the farm of another man for ten years. One day, he wanted to go out on his own and purchase a piece of land to farm. But he had not saved enough to buy good bottom land. He ended up purchasing a piece of land that no one wanted. It was located in hill country. It was all he could afford but he was willing to make it work. The next day, with a plow on his shoulder, he had climbed the hill to the land that he had not really seen yet. When, he got there, to his disappointment, he discovered that the land had little fertile top soil and was filled with rocks and stones of different sizes. He returned home dejected and very depressed, so much so, that he had not gone back for years.

One day, his friend found him wallowing in self pity, saying what a fool he was for purchasing a useless piece of land. They both went back to take a look so he can show  his folly. When they got there, he started to weep again. But his friend looked around very intently then he picked up a handful of stones. Looking at them a little more closely, he whooped in laughter. The depressed farmer asked if his friend found his situation funny. Then, his friend showed him the stones in his hands. At first, he thought they were just pebbles but then he found that they were really unpolished diamonds and a variety of gems. His friend indicated that his was filled with them. The farmer started to meticulously mine his land. The deeper he went, the more riches he found. He was the richest man in the land.

That land represents our Bibles. You wouldn’t believe how many people have casually purchased a Bible then leave it on the shelf neglected and collecting dust. They fail to see that within those pages is invaluable treasure that comes in the form of the wisdom and knowledge of God. Enter Jesus. He is the ‘friend’ in the story and he sheds light to show what you, me… all of us (in one time or another) have missed out.

Jesus said, “Store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.” (Matthew 6:20,21) So, in a nutshell, start digging through your Bible! And start digging deep! Put all your heart on it and you’ll see what true wealth is. And by the way, you don’t have to dig by yourself. Give me a call and I’ll help. I don’t mind adding more wealth to my bank account in Heaven.

Until the next post,

Johann Q

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NLT – New Living Translation